top of page
  • Forthe Baby

Your 3 month old baby's growth and development

Updated: Nov 14, 2022



Introduction

It's easy to get overwhelmed with all of the changes in your life when you become a parent. But one thing that doesn't change is your baby's development—they're growing up in an incredible way each and every day. At 3 months old, there are some major milestones that should be on the horizon for your little one: their first smile, their first giggles and coos, and more!

The first few months of life are a period of incredible growth and development.

The first few months of life are a period of incredible growth and development. They are also a time when you will start to see how your baby's personality is emerging.

As your baby grows and develops, you may wonder what she can do, how often she'll be sleeping through the night or what her favourite toys are. You may notice that she's starting to smile at people more often or that she has started producing sounds other than crying! You might even notice that she has started smiling at certain people in particular - maybe it's mum or dad or another member of the family who makes her smile (and then maybe everyone else wonders why).

At 3 months, your baby should be able to lift their head by themselves.

At 3 months, your baby should be able to lift their head by themselves. This is a sign of development, and you can help them do this by supporting their head when you're helping them sit up or lift them into a sitting position. The important thing to note here is that even though they are able to lift their head on their own, the head should still be supported so that it doesn't fall forward or backward or sideways.

Your baby's brain is also growing at an enormous rate.

Your baby's brain is also growing at an enormous rate. In the first few weeks of life, your baby's brain grows twice as much as it will in the next 12 years combined.

Your newborn baby's brain is made up of more than 100 billion neurons and trillions of glial cells. The neurons are connected by synapses that transmit information from one nerve to another, allowing your child to learn new things.


The more sounds they hear and interactions they have, the faster they'll learn how to express themselves.

When you think about the things your baby has learned so far, you may have noticed that most of them came from being around other people. Your baby learns language by imitation, and seeing you and others speak. They also learn by playing with toys and other objects, listening to music and watching TV. The more sound they hear and interactions they have every day, the faster they'll learn how to express themselves!

If your baby doesn't seem to be sleeping much, you're not alone!

If your baby doesn't seem to be sleeping much, you're not alone! Babies sleep a lot in their first few months. Sleep is important for brain development. Babies need to sleep for at least 8 hours each night, and they should have at least 15 hours of total sleep every day (including naps).

If your baby isn't getting enough sleep, he or she may not be growing as fast as other babies—or at all! Without proper rest, your child will miss out on the benefits of deep REM (rapid eye movement) sleep that's associated with learning and memory skills like language acquisition. Don’t worry: it won’t last forever! As long as your little one is getting enough food and water each day, he'll eventually catch up on his growth spurt and start growing bigger than all his playmates...

Newborns can sleep without any problems for 20 or more hours a day.

It is important that you understand this aspect. Your newborns can sleep without any problems for 20 or more hours a day. The fact is, they need to sleep because of their brain development, growth, and immune system development

Understandably, you might feel a little anxious when your newborn seems to be sleeping all the time. But this is perfectly normal and necessary; it's called "sleeping through the night" (STN). A healthy full-term baby will usually spend at least two-thirds of their time in STN after three months old—that's about 16 hours per 24-hour period!

As babies become more aware of their surroundings and can move around, their sleep patterns change.

As your baby becomes more aware of her environment, she will become more responsive to sights and sounds. She may be able to see you or hear you calling her name. You might even notice that she smiles at a familiar face. As a result, babies often start waking up more during the night. This is normal because children have shorter sleep cycles than adults do (about 2 hours). Also, as they become better at moving around, they're more likely to get out of bed if they wake up in the middle of their nap time or night sleep cycle.

You'll also notice that your 3 month old baby is becoming more unpredictable! Babies' moods change quickly between happy and fussy; this may cause them to stop playing with toys one minute then immediately grab onto them again minutes later!

Most babies take about 30 minutes to fall asleep—that's about how long it takes for melatonin, the hormone that helps us feel sleepy, to work in a baby's body.

Did you know that it takes a baby about 30 minutes to fall asleep? That’s the amount of time it takes for melatonin, the hormone that helps us feel sleepy, to work in a baby's body. Melatonin is produced in the pineal gland in the brain and is made at night. It's also produced in response to darkness (like when it's nighttime outside), so when your baby goes from being exposed to light during the day to complete darkness at night, melatonin levels are higher than usual. This makes sense because sleeping helps an infant grow and develop; this process would be difficult if babies were awake all day long!


As your baby gets bigger, they'll need less sleep, but will still require 8-10 hours of sleep per 24 hour period.

As your baby gets bigger and their muscles become stronger, they'll need less sleep. Your newborn baby may need as many as 16 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period; by the time they're 3 months old, it's more like 12 to 14 hours. However, even though your child will require less sleep overall than a newborn (remember that newborns can't stay awake for long periods of time), most babies will still be tired after about eight hours of being awake.

The amount of sleep your little one needs depends on their age and where they are developmentally — if you have a three-month-old who's sleeping through the night from 7 p.m.-5 a.m., that's great! If not, don’t worry too much about it; some babies take longer than others to develop good sleeping habits. The important thing is that unless there are other concerns like colic or reflux (which can cause frequent waking), it's unlikely that anything serious is going on medically if your child isn't staying asleep through the night at this point in time

Their naps tend to get shorter too as they grow older, but may still need 2 or 3 naps per day until they're about 6 months old.

Your baby's naps will also begin to change as they age. In the first two months, their naps can last anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour (and sometimes it will vary within that range). As your baby grows older, their naps tend to get shorter too as they grow older and may still need 2 or 3 naps per day until they're about 6 months old. While this may mean more frequent changes in your daily schedule, it's important that you keep track of when they're sleeping so you don't wake them up unnecessarily by trying to feed them too early or at the wrong time of day. You'll need to figure out what works best for both of you once again!

There are a lot of ways you can soothe your newly mobile baby into sleep when bedtime rolls around!

There are a lot of ways you can soothe your newly mobile baby into sleep when bedtime rolls around!

If your baby is fussing and refusing to settle down, these techniques may help:

  • Rocking and swaddling. If you're worried about how much time it takes to rock or swaddle your newborn, don't be! The soothing sensations provided by rocking and swaddling are comforting for some babies. And the more often they experience them, the better they'll feel when they wake up in the middle of the night.

  • Singing. Whether it's an old favorite song or one that you've made up yourself (to the tune of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star"), singing is an easy way to calm down an upset baby who needs reassurance that everything will be OK again soon enough once they fall asleep again after being rocked or sung to! Some parents even find this method works well with older children who have trouble falling asleep at bedtime; just make sure not too sing loudly since there will likely be other people sleeping around them--and remember that sometimes music doesn't work well for everyone either so don't worry if trying one of these methods doesn't seem like its working right now but try another later instead!"


Babies' bodies grow extremely fast in their first few months of life.

Babies' bodies grow extremely fast in their first few months of life.

Babies' brains are growing at an enormous rate.

Babies' brains are developing at a very fast rate.

In the first three months of your baby's life, his brain is growing at a rapid pace and forming connections that will help him learn throughout his entire life.

Conclusion

Congratulations! You're now three months into parenthood, and your baby's development is starting to pick up steam. Your little one may still be small in size, but their brain is growing fast. This means that you'll likely notice some big changes in your baby's behavior by this point.

Take note of these signs as they can help you determine whether or not something is actually wrong with your child or just part of the normal progression of growth. After all, every baby develops differently! It can be tough to know what's normal for a three-month-old when there are so many factors involved like genetics and environment (like how much stimulation they get from other people), but these tips should help guide you through each developmental stage so that you're able to spot any potential problems early on before it gets too late.


The Only Full Body Swaddle that is 100% breathable and has a donut pillow to Prevent flathead syndrome and rollover. The satin lining helps with eczema, heat rash and temperature control. Double zipper for easy diaper changes.

Save time, money and parents sanity with the Full Body Swaddle.


0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page