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When can baby sleep with blanket

Updated: Nov 14, 2022



Introduction

The best time for a baby to have a blanket is when they are comfortable, relaxed and in a safe environment.

Section: 0-4 Months

If your baby is under 4 months old, it is not recommended that you use blankets or any other type of bedding with them while they sleep. Infants may suffer from overheating which can be potentially life threatening. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants sleep without any covering until the age of 12 months at the earliest (and ideally 18 months).

Section: 4-12 Months

After this age range, it may still be difficult for young children to regulate their body temperature during sleep due to their inability to move around easily or talk about what they're feeling if something goes wrong such as feeling too hot or cold. While some parents might think using blankets will help keep their child warm overnight (and thus reduce risk), this can actually increase the risk of suffocation and accidental strangulation by allowing the infant's face to become covered by material when cords get wrapped around them inside their cribs."


Step 1: Baby is asleep

The first step in the process of getting your baby to sleep with a blanket is to make sure she's asleep. While it may seem counterintuitive, swaddling too early will cause your baby to wake up and fight against the blanket, which could lead to stress and crying. On the flip side, waiting too long before swaddling can lead your baby to wake up when you try to swaddle her. The sweet spot is between 30 minutes and one hour after she's fallen asleep.

Once your baby is asleep, it's time to swaddle. You can use a blanket or a specially designed swaddling blanket that has Velcro straps on both ends. If you choose the latter, just make sure they aren't too tight—you don't want your baby feeling like she's being restrained!

Step 2: Baby's head and neck remain in a neutral position

The second step is to ensure that the baby’s head and neck remain in a neutral position. The area around the baby’s mouth, chin, and nose should be uncovered so that air can freely flow into his or her lungs. If a blanket is covering this area, it could restrict airflow and cause problems with breathing.

In addition to keeping the face uncovered, you should also make sure that your child's neck remains straight instead of bent or twisted. Your child should have no trouble moving his head from side to side without pain or discomfort.

If you notice any of these signs, take your child to a doctor right away. He or she will be able to determine if you need to seek medical attention and what type of treatment is best for your child’s condition.

Step 3: Baby's arms stay tucked inside the swaddle

Tuck your baby's arms into the swaddle, then wrap the blanket around them. This will help keep him or her from getting tangled in their blankets and keep their arms safe. If you're using a sleep sack instead of a traditional swaddle, make sure you buckle all four straps so that it fits snugly but not too tightly.

If your baby is too big for a swaddle but still needs some extra warmth at night, try using a sleep sack. They have more wiggle room and their arms are free to move.

If your baby isn't sleeping well, it can be hard to get any rest yourself. But if you follow our tips for getting your baby back on track with sleep, you may find that everyone in the house has more energy and happier days ahead.


Step 4: The bottom of the blanket is securely tucked under the mattress below baby's feet, with enough room for baby to kick.

You should tuck the bottom of the blanket under the mattress, so it’s secure and won't come loose. If you're using a swaddle that's too long for this purpose, take off some length by folding over one end or cutting it shorter. Make sure there's enough room for baby's legs to kick underneath without getting tangled up in the fabric.

If you're using a swaddle that's too long for this purpose, take off some length by folding over one end or cutting it shorter. Make sure there's enough room for baby's legs to kick underneath without getting tangled up in the fabric.


Step 5: The entire length of the blanket is securely tucked around baby's torso.

  • The entire length of the blanket is securely tucked around baby's torso.

  • There is enough room for baby to kick and move around.

  • The top of the blanket is securely tucked under one side of the mattress, below baby's shoulder level.

The blanket should be tucked in on both sides, but not so tightly that it restricts baby's movement. If the blanket is too loose, it can come untucked and pose a suffocation hazard. As a general rule of thumb, the blanket should be about twice as long as your child's height.


These are indications that you're doing it right!

If you're worried about your baby's safety, don't be. Swaddling your child is a great way to help him sleep through the night and feel secure in his crib. As long as you follow these guidelines, you'll know that your little one is safe:

  • Baby's head and neck remain in a neutral position—no need to worry about flat spots! Especially if you have a Donut Pillow

  • Arms stay tucked inside the swaddle. It's okay if they come out once in awhile, but make sure they don't stick out much past their bodies (this can lead to hip dysplasia). If they are sticking out too far, try rolling up more blanket material around them so that it hugs their body tightly. This will keep them from moving around too much during the night and getting tangled up in the fabric.

  • The top of the blanket is securely tucked under one side of mattress (not both sides), ensuring that one end doesn't get loose during sleep time

Conclusion

There is no right or wrong age to start using a blanket in your baby's crib. All babies are different, and all parents have different opinions about when their baby should be introduced to a blanket. The most important thing is that you make sure your baby sleeps safely when the blanket is used—that no blankets are within reach of a mobile child, and that the bedding fits snugly around them so they don't get tangled up.

But of course, the easiest of all methods is using the Best Sleep Sack.

The best sleep sack has adjustable teething mitts to prevent hair pulling and scratching. It is Fda grade for teething. Made of satin lining, which prevents eczema, heat rash and good for temperature control. Double zipper for easy diaper changes.


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