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  • Forthe Baby

LET THEM CRY OR DON’T

Updated: Nov 14, 2022

Introduction

You’re a new parent and in your baby’s first year of life, you’ll have many questions. I know I did when my son was born. When he cried, would it be better to let him cry or should I pick him up so that he could calm down? That question is one of the first questions new parents ask me as well as their friends who are also parents. Before answering this question, we need to understand why babies cry in the first place:


If your baby cries for a long time

When your baby cries for a long time and you're not sure what to do, it's okay to give them a little attention. If they are still crying after checking on them, offer some food or drink. If they continue to cry, try giving them a little more attention while they feed.

If the crying continues or gets worse when you try to comfort them, let them know that you are there by patting gently on their back while they feed or drink. Then leave the room quietly so they can settle themselves down again (without feeling abandoned).

If the crying continues or gets worse when you try to comfort them, let them know that you are there by patting gently on their back while they feed or drink. Then leave the room quietly so they can settle themselves down again (without feeling abandoned).


If a baby cries for no reason

If your baby is crying for no apparent reason, give her a few minutes to let the moment pass and see if she calms down on her own. If she doesn't, try giving her something else to do or look at. You can also softly rub or pat her back or legs until she falls asleep in your arms. The same rule applies: if your baby is hungry, tired or bored (or in pain), he'll tell you so by crying.

If a baby cries for no reason, give her a few minutes to let the moment pass and see if she calms down on her own. If she doesn't, try giving her something else to do or look at. You can also softly rub or pat her back or legs until she falls asleep in your arms.

Same rule applies: if your baby is hungry, tired or bored (or in pain), he'll tell you so by crying. If a baby cries for no apparent reason, give her a few minutes to let the moment pass and see if she calms down on her own. If she doesn't , try giving her something else to do or look at. You can also softly rub or pat her back or legs until she falls asleep in your arms. Same rule applies: if your baby is hungry, tired or bored (or in pain), he'll tell you so by crying. If a baby cries for no apparent reason, give her a few minutes to let the moment pass and see if she calms down on her own.


If your baby cries a lot at night

If your baby cries a lot at night, it might be because:

  • They're teething. Babies have a hard time chewing solid foods and often find comfort in gnawing on their fingers or the corners of their pacifier.

  • They're hungry, but you can't supply breastmilk (or formula) as quickly as they need it.

  • They're scared of the dark and unfamiliar sounds of nighttime or simply lonely for you. This is especially common when moving from one room to another with them (e.g., going from crib to bassinet). A white noise machine might help—but if not, try comforting them by singing a lullaby or telling them about their day while you move around quietly close by so they can hear your voice without being startled by any sudden movements!

  • They're wet and need changing; if this happens more than once per night, consider using cloth diapers instead of disposables so that there's no need to wake up every few hours just because someone needs new clothes! If using disposables is unavoidable (especially at first), make sure that there aren't any issues with whether or not those diapers actually fit properly--it could mean having different sizes due to toilet training efforts gone wrong early on--and make sure there's always plenty available before bedtime starts getting later each day because then there isn't enough time left over during nap-time to get everything done! It's also a good idea to have plenty of extra diapers on hand, just in case something happens and you need to change your child more than once during the night.


If your baby is colicky

Colic is a common condition in newborns. It's characterized by excessive crying that can make life miserable for your baby and everyone who cares about him or her. Colic is often described as "spasms of crying" and usually occurs during the first three months of life. Infants with colic cry more than usual, often at night and after eating. They may also have upset stomachs or bowel movements that seem painful to them, but most babies with colic are otherwise healthy.

As a parent, you may feel helpless if your baby has colic because there's so little you can do besides hold him close until he stops crying—and then start over again soon afterward!

Colicky babies are more than just fussy. They cry more than three hours a day and at least three days per week for longer than three weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Colic is no fun for anyone involved. You might feel helpless as you try everything from changing up his diet (or yours!) to rocking him constantly.



If you have to do something

The baby is crying, and you're doing what you can to comfort it. It seems like every time you soothe them, they cry even more. Try not to get frustrated—it's hard for everyone involved! If you have to do something else for a minute (like go to the bathroom), then that's okay: just leave a note saying where you are and what time it is when you expect to be back. If your child needs attention from someone else, let another family member or friend take over soothing them for a few minutes or longer as needed.

Remember that crying is normal, and it's how babies communicate. They can't tell you what they need or want in any other way except by making noise, so try not to let yourself get too stressed out when this happens.



You can choose whether or not to let your baby cry.

You can choose whether or not to let your baby cry.

You can decide whether or not to let your baby cry. You can decide when, how and how long to let your baby cry. You can also be aware that it’s OK for them to cry, and that they will do so again (and probably again).

The point is not to let your baby cry for no reason, but to let them cry when it is necessary. If you are able to help yourself without hurting them or making any decisions that’ll affect their well-being, then do so.

You can decide whether or not to let your baby cry. You can decide when, how and how long to let your baby cry. You can also be aware that it’s OK for them to cry, and that they will do so again (and probably again). The point is not to let your baby cry for no reason, but to let them cry when it is necessary.


Conclusion

We hope you found this information helpful and can make the best decisions for your baby. We understand that it’s not always easy to know how much crying is too much crying, but we also believe that most parents want what’s best for their children and will do whatever they can to keep them happy and healthy.

If you have to go to the bathroom, make dinner, or check on the baby's siblings in another room for a minute or two, that's okay: just leave a note saying where you are and when it is when you expect to be back. If your child needs attention from someone else, let another family member or friend take over soothing them for a few minutes as needed.

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