top of page
  • Forthe Baby

How skin to skin and its benefits

Updated: Nov 14, 2022

Introduction

Skin-to-skin and kangaroo care are both practices that involve placing a baby on their mother's skin, usually bare chest. Skin-to-skin contact is the practice of holding a baby against the bare chest of a parent or caregiver. It can also refer to placing a baby directly on the skin of mom (or dad) after birth. Kangaroo care involves wearing your baby in an upright position inside your shirt for several hours per day; this method has been shown to reduce crying and improve breastfeeding success rates. Both techniques have been shown to have many benefits for infants and parents alike, including promoting bonding between parent and infant as well as helping babies regulate their body temperature after birth.


Skin-to-skin contact is the practice of holding a baby against the bare chest of a parent or caregiver. It is thought to help lower stress and improve bonding, among other benefits.

Skin-to-skin contact is the practice of holding a baby against the bare chest of a parent or caregiver. It is thought to help lower stress and improve bonding, among other benefits.

  • Skin-to-skin helps babies regulate their body temperature.

  • Skin-to-skin helps babies regulate their heart rate.

  • Skin-to-skin helps babies regulate their blood pressure.


Skin-to-skin contact may also help keep a baby warm, lower the risk of infection, and help breast and/or bottle feeding.

Skin-to-skin contact may also help keep a baby warm, lower the risk of infection, and help breast and/or bottle feeding.

  • Keeping them warm: Being born without clothes or being wrapped in anything other than your mom’s arms can make newborns feel chilled. Skin-to-skin contact helps keep babies warm by transferring heat from mom’s body to theirs. This is especially important for premature babies who may weigh as little as 1 pound (454 grams).

  • Protecting against infections: A mother's immune system provides protection against some infections that are passed through bodily fluids like saliva and vaginal secretions during birth. Skin-to-skin contact allows this transfer of immunity from mom directly to her baby while they're together immediately after birth.

  • Helping breast or bottle feeding: Breastfeeding is recommended for all mothers and babies because it has many health benefits for both mother and infant over formula feeding according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The AAP recommends breastfeeding exclusively (no water, juice or other liquids) for six months after birth with continuation into first year if possible; however many women choose not to breastfeed due to painful feelings such as sore nipples caused by engorgement when milk production increases suddenly after childbirth which usually lasts about two weeks before pain decreases significantly."


Skin-to-skin helps babies regulate their body temperature.

A baby's ability to regulate temperature is important for growth and development. Babies who are not held skin-to-skin can have trouble staying warm when it's cold, or cool when it's hot. Breastfeeding is a lot easier for your baby when she’s in close contact with you because your body heat helps keep her warm and comfortable. Skin-to-skin newborn care also helps babies sleep better at night, which means less crying! The comfort of being close with their parents also makes it easier for babies to breastfeed during those first few days after birth (or weeks if they're adopted).

Having someone hold you while they touch you can help you feel safe and secure or help calm down if something scares you. For example, if a doctor needs to give medicine or an injection, the nurse might need to hold one arm so that he or she can still do what they need while keeping the other hand free; this would make everyone feel more comfortable!


Research indicates that skin-to-skin contact can lower a baby's heart rate and blood pressure if they are born prematurely.

Research indicates that skin-to-skin contact can lower a baby's heart rate and blood pressure if they are born prematurely. A study published in the Journal of Perinatology found that premature babies who had skin-to-skin contact with their mothers immediately after birth had lower average heart rates and higher average oxygen levels than babies who didn't have skin-to-skin contact. The study also reported that these benefits were maintained as long as three days after birth.


Newborns have difficulty regulating their heart rate and blood pressure.

Newborns have difficulty regulating their heart rate and blood pressure. Skin to skin contact helps newborns regulate their body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure, as well as breathing.

Being held skin to skin can also help babies cry less and gain more weight. One of the most important benefits is that skin-to-skin contact provides an opportunity for parents to bond with their newborns.

This contact helps newborns regulate their heart rate and blood pressure, as well as breathing. Being held skin to skin can also help babies cry less and gain more weight. One of the most important benefits is that skin-to-skin contact provides an opportunity for parents to bond with their newborns.


According to a 2015 study, skin-to-skin contact after cesarean sections may reduce the mother's pain in recovery, while also giving the newborn beneficial bacteria from his or her mother's skin.

  • Skin-to-skin contact after cesarean sections may reduce the mother's pain in recovery, while also giving the newborn beneficial bacteria from his or her mother's skin.

  • Skin-to-skin contact can help the newborn adapt to breathing air rather than receiving oxygen from the umbilical cord.

  • Skin to skin contact is especially important for premature babies who need help adapting to life outside of their mothers' wombs.

It has been found that skin-to-skin contact can help increase the number of beneficial bacteria in a newborn's gut. Beneficial bacteria is important for boosting immunity and keeping harmful bacteria out of your digestive system.


A 2009 study found that skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth helped babies to adapt to breathing air rather than receiving oxygen from the umbilical cord.

Skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth helps babies regulate their body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. Babies who are placed skin-to-skin with their mothers or caregivers for at least one hour have better regulation of their body temperature than those who aren't held this way.

The research also found that it can help babies adapt to breathing air rather than receiving oxygen from the umbilical cord.

A 2009 study found that skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth helped babies to adapt to breathing air rather than receiving oxygen from the umbilical cord. The research also found that it can help babies regulate their body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure.


A 2010 research review suggested that skin-to-skin contact was helpful for increasing breastfeeding duration.

Skin-to-skin contact has had a positive effect on newborns, mothers and breastfeeding. A 2010 research review suggested that skin-to-skin contact was helpful for increasing breastfeeding duration (Kangaroo Mother Care Study Group 1993). Some studies have also found that skin to skin contact can help babies sleep better.

The reason skin to skin is so successful at this time is because of the immediate bonding process between mother and child, as well as breastfeeding.

1. Benefits for newborns - Lowers stress and anxiety levels in babies, leading to less crying and fussing - Facilitates a better start for breastfeeding because it boosts prolactin levels in mothers, which stimulates milk production - Helps babies regulate their temperature, heart rate, and breathing


A 2013 study found that babies were more likely to remain calm during painful procedures if they had been in skin to skin with their parent during recovery from birth.

  • Skin-to-skin contact may help babies to regulate their heart rate and blood pressure.

  • Skin-to-skin contact may reduce the mother's pain in recovery.

  • Skin-to-skin contact may help babies to adapt to breathing air, which is important for their future health.

New research shows that skin-to-skin contact with a parent can be beneficial for baby. A 2013 study found that babies were more likely to remain calm during painful procedures if they had been in skin to skin with their parent during recovery from birth.


Many hospitals now recommend that fathers perform this procedure in the first hour after delivery.

You can do it as well as your partner.

Many hospitals now recommend that fathers perform this procedure in the first hour after delivery. This is because research has shown that skin-to-skin contact with a caregiver helps newborns regulate their body temperature, heart rate, breathing and blood pressure; promotes breastfeeding; and reduces crying.

To keep your baby warm during skin-to-skin contact:

  • If you're planning on doing kangaroo care (KC), make sure you have a wrap or swaddle that's big enough for both of you to be wrapped up together comfortably. KC can also be done without wraps if there are other caregivers available to help keep the baby warm while they're being held close by their parents' chest or side.

  • If it's cold where you live, keep the room at around 72 degrees Fahrenheit (22 degrees Celsius), which should be comfortable for everyone involved and not too hot or cold for either parent or child. Also remember that babies prefer cooler temperatures than adults do so don't worry about turning up the thermostat too high!


Skin to skin is good for Moms/Dads and babies

Skin-to-skin contact is good for both mom and baby. It helps babies regulate their body temperature, breathe, adapt to breathing air, calm down, and bond with their parents.

For new moms who might be nervous about holding a slippery newborn, skin-to-skin can help you feel more confident in this new phase of parenthood. It also gives your baby a chance to get used to being outside the womb before going into the world for the first time!


Conclusion

Hopefully, you’re now convinced that skin-to-skin contact is good for your baby. It’s a great way to help him or her adapt to life outside the womb, and it can also help lower stress in both parents. If you have any questions or concerns about this process, please contact your doctor or midwife immediately. And if you want to read more about what else can be done during childbirth, check out our article on the benefits of delayed cord clamping!


Everything your baby needs for the best night sleep ever every night.

Every baby needs a good night’s sleep but finding a way to get them there is not always easy. That’s why we came up with our dedicated baby sleep products so your little one can have the best sleep ever, every night.


0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page