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Best way to sleep for tummy sleepers

Updated: Nov 13, 2022



Introduction

The most common sleeping position for adults is on their side, but a fair number of us sleep on our stomachs.

This is considered the worst position for a good night's sleep due to its tendency to cause neck and back problems.

But if you just can't sleep any other way, there are adjustments you can make to your pillow and your bed to help you sleep better at night.

Here's how:

The most common sleeping position for adults is on their side, but a fair number of us sleep on our stomachs.

The most common sleeping position for adults is on their side, but a fair number of us sleep on our stomachs. Our tummies are sensitive and need to be protected from pain. If you're one of these people, follow these tips to ensure that you have the best possible night's sleep while resting on your tummy:

  • Sleep on a soft bed with high-thread count sheets

  • Use an anti-allergenic pillow cover

  • Use an adjustable height mattress if possible

This is considered the worst position for a good night's sleep due to its tendency to cause neck and back problems.

You might be surprised to learn that this is considered the worst position for a good night’s sleep due to its tendency to cause neck and back problems.

If you prefer sleeping on your stomach, it's important to make sure that you are using proper support under your head and neck. A pillow between your knees will help keep your spine aligned while keeping pressure off of your lower back.

Another important factor in preventing pain while lying on the right side is how the mattress feels to you. If it doesn't feel right, there are things that can be done about it! We'll talk more about how to choose a mattress later in our How To Sleep Well series - but first let's find out what happens if we sleep on our left side.


But if you just can't sleep any other way, there are adjustments you can make to your pillow and your bed to help you sleep better at night.

If you're a tummy sleeper and are having trouble sleeping, there are some steps you can take to make your sleep better:

  • Adjust the pillow. The right pillow is essential for good sleep, and if yours isn't helping, try getting a new one that supports your head and neck better without putting pressure on the rest of your body. Try using a contoured memory foam or latex pillow, which will give the best support while still being soft enough not to cause pain in your neck or back (and they'll be less expensive than specialty pillows). Bonus: Some brands offer models specifically designed for stomach sleepers!

  • Get rid of loose bedding. If you have loose covers or blankets that tend to bunch up around areas where people spend most of their time (such as under their neck), this can make it hard for them to breathe properly at night—which means less restful sleep for everyone involved! Make sure all blankets/sheets/etcetera are secured so they don't move when someone moves around in bed—and if possible avoid using any covers at all if they're too warm or heavy during summer months (because we know how hot those nights can get).


Here's how.

  • Use a pillow that supports your neck. A good support pillow is one that keeps the head, neck and spine aligned, so you can sleep in comfort. If you’re having trouble finding a pillow or mattress to help with this, talk to your doctor about how to adjust your bedding for better alignment.

  • Get a body pillow that keeps your spine aligned. A body pillow will keep you from sleeping on your stomach or back, both of which can cause health issues such as acid reflux and heartburn after eating while lying down on either side during the night (not great). The ideal body pillow should be able to accommodate the length of your torso and provide support underneath both shoulders when resting on either side during sleep—this will keep them propped up off the mattress surface so they aren't crushed by gravity throughout each night's restful slumber!

  • Try using an adjustable wedge-shaped cushion under shoulders while sleeping on back instead (if possible). It may seem counterintuitive at first but placing something between shoulder blades while lying down flat helps align spinal column without causing any strain whatsoever--even though it might feel weird at first!


A good pillow should be able to support your head and neck, keeping them in a neutral alignment regardless of any changes in position during sleep. The best pillows for tummy sleepers are firm but not hard, allowing you to adjust them so they support your head without digging into the back of it or creating pressure points that can disturb sleep.

The right pillow should also keep your spine in proper alignment as it supports your head and neck. This is especially important if you're a side sleeper because side-sleeping puts more strain on the neck than being on your back does—and being a tummy sleeper means that whatever position you happen to fall into while sleeping isn't necessarily going to be one where everything is aligned properly! A good option for side-sleepers is an adjustable contour pillow: one with individual pieces that can be moved around so that each person has their own custom fit!


Conclusion

Sleeping on your stomach is not ideal, but it's something that many parents have to deal with. If you're one of them, don't despair! There are ways to make this position more comfortable so that you can enjoy a deep sleep without pain or waking up with neck soreness in the morning.


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